Must-Do’s For Your Best Sleep Ever

To-do lists might be overwhelming for some people. Especially if you make them at the start of what appears to be a hectic workday. Have you considered making a pre-bedtime to-do list? Please bear with us here: It can make a big difference in how well you sleep if you do the correct things an hour before night. That’s right: your pre-bedtime routine can have a significant impact on your sleep quality.

This is significant because sleep quality (also known as sleep hygiene) makes a significant difference. Better sleep, not necessarily longer sleep, has been linked to a variety of superior cognitive functions, including improved learning, memory, and mood, according to research. Furthermore, good sleep is connected to better blood sugar control and weight management.

We spoke with sleep specialists to find out what you should do in the hour before bedtime.

ENJOY A RELAXING ACTIVITY

Reading a book, rinsing off in a lukewarm shower, or simply jotting down some things you’re grateful for from the previous 24 hours can all be relaxing activities to look forward to. Frida Rngtell, PhD, sleep specialist at Sleep Cycle, says, “Think about whether activities help you wind down or make you more alert and keep those that assist you wind down closer to night.” “Think about whether those that make you more alert are important in your evening routine, and if they are, plan them as early as possible to avoid their interfering with bedtime.”

JUDGEMENT CAN BE SET ASIDE

Maybe you’re having one of those days where you’re not getting to bed as quickly as you’d want. Think good thoughts instead of focusing on how little sleep you may receive and fretting about the circumstance. Annie Miller, LCSW, states, “Soothe negative ideas regarding sleep by recognising that you will be fine if you don’t sleep well that night.” “Before going to bed, try to divert your thoughts to something more positive.”

SHOWER OR TAKE A WARM BATH

According to a study published in Sleep Medicine Reviews, around an hour before bed is a good time to wash away the tension of the day. Experts discovered that taking a warm bath or shower before bed can improve sleep quality and make it easier to fall asleep. Just make sure you don’t do it too close to bedtime, since your body temperature will need to adjust. Aim for one hour (or a little more) before turning out the lights.

AVOID DOOMSCROLLING AT ALL COSTS.

Everything from social media to emails should be avoided if you want to reduce tension, concern, or strong emotions. “When we use social media or read the news, we don’t know what we’ll be exposed to or what feelings it will elicit, and it’s easy to be trapped for too long,” Rngtell adds. “Think twice before checking your work email one more time before going to bed, and consider avoiding screens entirely at this time of day.”

SET UP YOUR SLEEPING AREA

You want to make sure your bed is just used for sleeping and that it is ready for you when you arrive. Depending on the season, this could mean removing a couple pillows or shifting out a blanket to make you more comfortable for the day’s temperature inside your home. “When you teach your brain that the bed is primarily used for sleeping, it allows your brain to form a link between bed and sleep,” Miller explains. “Avoid reading in bed, watching TV in bed, and even snoozing your alarm clock in bed for an extended period of time in the morning.”

EATING AND DRINKING ARE EXCLUSIVELY EXCLUSIVELY EXCLUSIVELY E

When we eat or drink too close to bedtime, our bodies have something else to focus on when they should be preparing to sleep. Eating before bed has also been linked to metabolic syndrome, which includes excessive body fat and blood pressure and can increase your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes or heart disease, according to study.

Especially when it comes to alcohol or a nightly glass of wine, which may help you fall asleep faster but disturbs your REM cycle as the hours pass, reducing the quality of your sleep. The longer time you have between your last drink and hitting the pillow, the better.

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS PERFECT PRACTICE.

Keep in mind that relaxation does not always come naturally. Allow yourself enough time to learn how to calm your mind and manage your emotions. “Mindfulness, relaxation techniques, and scheduling time for contemplation, for example, can all be beneficial,” says Rngtell. “Give yourself some time to adjust to your new habit and be patient with your bedtime buffer zone.”

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